Markets

AUTHORITIES AND REGULATORS

AUTHORITIES AND REGULATORS

Although shipping is one of the safest modes of transport, accidents unfortunately do happen. As an independent institute, MARIN works together with governments, classification agencies, shipping- and other maritime companies to make maritime operations safer.

traffic studies

How many ships pass the Dutch coast each day? What is their size and speed? How much CO2 do they emit? Typical questions of the government when making decisions regarding the spatial planning of the North Sea or other infrastructural changes. MARIN can give the answers by analysing AIS data. A good example is our network evaluation, an AIS analysis executed for Rijkswaterstaat every two years. The traffic analysis forms the basis for the further risk assessment and safety studies model.

traffic studies

How many ships pass the Dutch coast each day? What is their size and speed? How much CO2 do they emit? Typical questions of the government when making decisions regarding the spatial planning of the North Sea or other infrastructural changes. MARIN can give the answers by analysing AIS data. A good example is our network evaluation, an AIS analysis executed for Rijkswaterstaat every two years. The traffic analysis forms the basis for the further risk assessment and safety studies model.

risk assessments

The Dutch government is developing a large number of wind farms on the North Sea. What are the consequences of these developments on the safety of shipping? To answer this question we follow the Formal Safety Assessment (FSA) methodology. This is a rational and systematic process for assessing risks and to evaluate mitigating measures.
Our software tool SAMSON contributes to safety and environmental risk assessments. Input of the model is a traffic database of shipping activities in the area. SAMSON includes accident frequency models for collision, grounding, fire/explosions, contacts etc. to determine the accident frequencies. It also includes impact modules for assessing the consequences of the accidents. MARIN has set up risk models and executed risk assessments for area’s in Canada, France, the Baltic and the North Sea.

risk assessments

The Dutch government is developing a large number of wind farms on the North Sea. What are the consequences of these developments on the safety of shipping? To answer this question we follow the Formal Safety Assessment (FSA) methodology. This is a rational and systematic process for assessing risks and to evaluate mitigating measures.
Our software tool SAMSON contributes to safety and environmental risk assessments. Input of the model is a traffic database of shipping activities in the area. SAMSON includes accident frequency models for collision, grounding, fire/explosions, contacts etc. to determine the accident frequencies. It also includes impact modules for assessing the consequences of the accidents. MARIN has set up risk models and executed risk assessments for area’s in Canada, France, the Baltic and the North Sea.

ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION

Maritime accidents often have a huge impact on society. They can result in loss of life or serious damage to the environment. A dramatic example is the capsizing of the South Korean ferry Sewol. 304, most of them, students lost their lives. MARIN has the capabilities to reconstruct accidents like this through simulations and/or model tests. A thorough reconstruction is possible when all available data regarding the circumstances of the accident are available. In some cases, like with the Sewol, the investigation consists of a series of model tests to be able to model the hydrodynamic characteristics in our simulation models. Also unique in this project was a detailed model of the vessel and its interior. This made it possible to simulate the flooding of the vessel on model scale and to study a number of flooding scenario’s.

ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION

Maritime accidents often have a huge impact on society. They can result in loss of life or serious damage to the environment. A dramatic example is the capsizing of the South Korean ferry Sewol. 304, most of them, students lost their lives. MARIN has the capabilities to reconstruct accidents like this through simulations and/or model tests. A thorough reconstruction is possible when all available data regarding the circumstances of the accident are available. In some cases, like with the Sewol, the investigation consists of a series of model tests to be able to model the hydrodynamic characteristics in our simulation models. Also unique in this project was a detailed model of the vessel and its interior. This made it possible to simulate the flooding of the vessel on model scale and to study a number of flooding scenario’s.

Vessel Traffic Services and Ship control centres

Logistics and transportation are more and more data driven. Shipping is an important link in the logistic chain. In inland waterway transport the traditional VTS will disappear and will be replaced by Vessel Traffic Management (VTM). Passage of bridges and locks will be optimised and shippers will receive a time slot well in advance so they can adjust their ship speed to arrive just in time. This will reduce the emissions of the ship and infrastructure will be used more effectively. The other development is the automation of the vessels towards autonomous ships. Vessels plan their route automatically and take deviating measures to avoid collisions. Operators in a Shore Control Centre (SCC) monitor the vessel and can intervene in case of an emergency.
What is the impact of these developments on future VTS/VTM or on SCC? Which information should be available to the operator and when? What will be the interaction between a VTS and a SCC? In our simulator facilities we can study these questions and optimise the situational awareness of operators on shore.

Vessel Traffic Services and Ship control centres

Logistics and transportation are more and more data driven. Shipping is an important link in the logistic chain. In inland waterway transport the traditional VTS will disappear and will be replaced by Vessel Traffic Management (VTM). Passage of bridges and locks will be optimised and shippers will receive a time slot well in advance so they can adjust their ship speed to arrive just in time. This will reduce the emissions of the ship and infrastructure will be used more effectively. The other development is the automation of the vessels towards autonomous ships. Vessels plan their route automatically and take deviating measures to avoid collisions. Operators in a Shore Control Centre (SCC) monitor the vessel and can intervene in case of an emergency.
What is the impact of these developments on future VTS/VTM or on SCC? Which information should be available to the operator and when? What will be the interaction between a VTS and a SCC? In our simulator facilities we can study these questions and optimise the situational awareness of operators on shore.

SHIP DESIGN RULES AND REGULATIONS

Ships have to fulfil manoeuvring requirements posed by either owners, local governments, classification societies, the IMO or the NATO. We have the perfect facilities and experience to verify whether these requirements are fulfilled. The manoeuvring capability of a ship can be predicted by simulations, model tests or by using our simulators and it can be measured on full scale. MARIN also supports governments, classification agencies and other market parties to develop policy advice, new design rules and regulations.

SHIP DESIGN RULES AND REGULATIONS

Ships have to fulfil manoeuvring requirements posed by either owners, local governments, classification societies, the IMO or the NATO. We have the perfect facilities and experience to verify whether these requirements are fulfilled. The manoeuvring capability of a ship can be predicted by simulations, model tests or by using our simulators and it can be measured on full scale. MARIN also supports governments, classification agencies and other market parties to develop policy advice, new design rules and regulations.