SATURN

Solutions At Underwater Radiated Noise

Running

SATURN addresses the adverse effects of underwater radiated noise on individual marine species and whole populations and seeks to develop technologies and measures to reduce and mitigate the negative impact of underwater noise.

Background

Underwater radiated noise (URN), from shipping and other human activities, is a complex global issue that requires a transdisciplinary approach. SATURN is a Horizon 2020-funded project that brings together leading experts from a variety of disciplines (bioacoustics; population biology; marine mammal, fish, and invertebrate biology; maritime architecture and engineering; shipping; maritime policy; stakeholder engagement and science communication) to address the negative impacts of ocean noise on marine species and identify:

  1. The sounds that are most detrimental to aquatic species and how they are produced and propagated;
  2. The short-term and cumulative long-term negative impacts of noise from shipping and boats on three representative groups of aquatic species in rivers and the sea (invertebrates, fish, and marine mammals);
  3. The most promising options for measuring and reducing the negative impacts of ship noise that can be applied to current and future vessels
SATURN will develop and contribute to the establishment of standards for terminology and methodology to be used across all disciplines working on underwater radiated noise. These standards will underpin the proposed research. The consortium will establish and nurture an effective community of researchers, practitioners, competent authorities, maritime operators, shipping/offshore/naval industries, and NGOs. This group will work closely with the project to ensure that outputs are tailored to the needs of all stakeholders and to maximize their uptake and application. SATURN proposes to confront the complex global issue of underwater radiated noise in a truly inclusive, transdisciplinary way that will ensure that the interests and knowledge of all stakeholders and the environment are represented.

more information

This project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement no. 101006443.

Contact

Contact person photo

Johan Bosschers

Senior Researcher