Queen Mary 2 seakeeping assessment: the owner’s requirements, the design verification and operational experience
Author Dallinga R.P., Gaillarde G. and Payne S. [Cunard]
Title Queen Mary 2 seakeeping assessment: the owner’s requirements, the design verification and operational experience
Conference/Journal Cruise & Ferry
Year 2005

Abstract
The Queen Mary 2 is quite a remarkable ship. The withdrawal of Cunard’s venerable 80,000 grt Queens, Mary (1936) and Elizabeth (1940), by late 1968 was only partially offset with the introduction of the 65,000 grt Queen Elizabeth 2 in 1969. Many suggested that once the new Queen had seen out her lifespan the age of the transatlantic liner would finally come to an end. Certainly the cost differential between building and operating a true liner compared to a cruise ship was identified as a major obstacle for any future transatlantic project. This could only be overcome if there was an overwhelming demand for the continuation of the Atlantic ferry.

The differences between the liner and cruise ship can be described as fundamental: -

• The liner generally is higher powered and in consequence generally has a higher speed potential compared to the cruise ship
• The liner generally has a deeper draught compared to the cruise ship
• The liner generally has a higher deadweight capacity compared to the cruise ship
• The liner generally has greater strength compared to the cruise ship
• The liner generally has a finer form compared to the cruise ship

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